San Francisco mayoral candidates battle for 'soul' of city

San Francisco mayoral candidates battle for 'soul' of city
In this photo taken Friday, April 13, 2018, San Francisco mayoral candidate and Board of Supervisors President London Breed poses at Alamo Square with "The Painted Ladies" in the background in San Francisco. San Francisco could make history by electing for mayor the first African-American woman, Asian-American woman or openly gay man in a contest that is also the first truly competitive mayoral race the city has seen in 15 years. Breed, 43, is a native San Franciscan and African-American who overcame a rough childhood to become president of the Board of Supervisors. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — San Francisco could make history by electing its first African-American woman, Asian-American woman or openly gay man for mayor in June.

The winner will inherit a city rolling in both wealth and misery as the tech-based boom that has defined San Francisco shows little signs of going away. People are cranky over homeless tent camps and human waste on the streets.

The median sale price of a home hit $1.3 million in March.

The last time San Francisco had a mayor's race without an incumbent was in 2003. Mayor Ed Lee died suddenly in December, bumping up to June 5 a contest planned for November 2019.

The best known candidates are Board President London Breed and Supervisor Jane Kim, former state Sen. Mark Leno and former Supervisor Angela Alioto.

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